Your Upcoming Hospital Visit

How We’re Keeping You Safe

Texas Health has taken steps to help limit the spread of COVID-19 and make our facilities safe for everyone:

  • Virtual visits for patients and loved ones are encouraged.
  • Dedicated building entrances with visitor screening stations
  • Limited number of visitors on campus; all are screened at arrival.
  • Screening stations provide temperature checks, handwashing and sanitizing stations, and masks. Find out how to best protect yourself when wearing a mask.
  • Universal masking: all visitors, patients, and health care personnel wear masks while on campus.
  • Access to handwashing and sanitizing stations and supplies for visitors and patients.
  • Closure of public water, food, and beverage stations.
  • Re-organized seating areas to allow for safe distancing.
  • Patients tested before most procedures.
  • Distancing of patients according to positive/negative COVID-19 status.
  • Health care personnel self-monitor for symptoms; caregivers with symptoms must stay home.
  • Follow-up calls to check on patients after leaving the hospital.
  • Consumer hotline staffed by nurses to answer questions and concerns, 682-236-7601.
  • Updated Labor & Delivery, Postpartum, and NICU visiting guidelines to further protect mother, baby, partner, patients, and staff
Testing
  • Should I get tested for COVID-19?
    • If you have symptoms, call your doctor first. Your doctor may order testing based on your symptoms and risk factors.
    • Some people can get better at home and may not need to be tested.
  • Where can I get tested?
    • It depends on what prompted the need for a test. If you are having a procedure at Texas Health, you will likely receive a test prior to your procedure as part of your pre-assessment testing. If you have symptoms, your doctor can order testing and help you make an appointment. 
    • Test results are typically available in 24 – 72 hours. A Texas Health nurse may call you, or current MyChart users can check their account.
    • While waiting for test results, you should stay at home. Minimize contact with others, including pets. Wear a mask or face covering. Practice safe social distancing. Wash your hands often. And sanitize surfaces that are touched often.
    • You can also visit Texas Health and Human Services’ website to look for local information about testing.
  • How long does it take for test results?

    If you were tested at a Texas Health location

    • Results can take up to a week or longer.
    • A Texas Health nurse will call you with results. If you are a current Texas Health MyChart user, test results are posted as soon as the result is final.
    • While waiting for test results:
      • Stay at home. 
      • Minimize contact with others, including pets.
      • Wear a mask or face covering.
      • Practice safe distancing.
      • Wash your hands often, and sanitize items and surfaces that are touched often.

  • What if my test is positive?
    • If you have tested positive for COVID-19, you will need to stay home, and self-isolate. This means you should avoid contact with others in your household, including pets.
    • You should self-isolate until you meet the criteria to be around others. Talk to your doctor about when you should discontinue self-isolation. View the criteria below to see guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    1. If you were tested because:

    • You had/have COVID-19 symptoms AND
    • You were very sick with COVID-19 OR
    • You have other health conditions OR
    • You have a weakened immune system

    Then you will need to call your doctor for advice on how long you’ll need to isolate yourself from others, including pets. 

    2. If you were tested because:

    • You HAD/HAVE COVID-19 symptoms AND
    • You WERE NOT very sick with COVID-19 AND
    • You DO NOT have other health conditions AND
    • You DO NOT have a weakened immune system

    Then you will need to self-isolate in your home until:

    10 days have passed since your first symptom(s) AND

    • You are fever free for at least 24 hours AND
    • You are not using any medication to reduce a fever AND
    • Your symptoms have improved.

    3. If you were tested because:

    • You DID NOT HAVE COVID-19 symptoms AND
    • You WERE NOT very sick with COVID-19 AND
    • You DO NOT have other health conditions AND
    • You DO NOT have a weakened immune system:

    Then you need to stay isolated until 10 days have passed since your first positive COVID-19 non-blood (molecular) test.

  • What if my test is negative?
    • You could still have COVID-19, because it can take up to 14 days from the day you were exposed before you have symptoms or positive results.
    • You may still need to self-isolate based on your current health and COVID-19 status. You should self-isolate until you meet the criteria to be around others. Talk to your doctor about when you should discontinue self-isolation. View the criteria below to see guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    1. If you were tested because you HAD OR HAVE COVID-19 symptoms AND:

    • You have other health conditions OR
    • You have a weakened immune system OR
    • You were very sick with COVID-19:

    Then you need to call your doctor for advice. Your doctor can tell you how long you’ll need to isolate yourself from others, including pets.

    2. If you were tested because you HAD OR HAVE COVID-19 symptoms AND:

    • You DO NOT have other health conditions AND
    • You DO NOT have a weakened immune system AND
    • You WERE NOT very sick with COVID-19:

    Then you will need to self-isolate in your home until:

    • 10 days have passed since your first symptom(s) AND
    • You are fever free for at least 24 hours AND
    • You are not using any medication to reduce a fever AND
    • Your symptoms have improved.

    3. If you were tested because you were AROUND SOMEONE WITH COVID-19 AND:

    • You HAVE NOT TESTED POSITIVE for COVID-19 in the last 90 days:

    Then you will need to self-isolate in your home for 14 days since your last contact with that person. Self-isolate means you MUST stay at home. This is important, because you could still get sick for at least 14 days since you were last around that person.

    4. IF you were tested because you were around AROUND SOMEONE WITH COVID-19 AND:

    • You HAVE TESTED POSITIVE FOR COVID-19 in the last 90 days:

    Then you need to self-isolate in your home until:

    • You have recovered completely from COVID-19 AND
    • You no longer have any COVID-19 symptoms.

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Visitor Guidelines
We know that having your loved ones with you is important. However, we are limiting the number of people in our facilities to protect patients and health care personnel. Effective April 6, 2021, our visitor guidelines have changed to allow two visitors for most hospital inpatients.

Download Visitor Guidelines
  • General Visitor Information
    • All visitors are screened each time they enter the facility. Visitors who have symptoms or other risk factors for COVID-19 will not be able to enter the facility.
    • Visitors must wear a wristband and face mask while in the building.
    • Visiting hours are 8:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.
    • Visitors should plan to remain in the patient’s room, including to eat food purchased in the cafeteria, and avoid congregating in waiting areas or lobbies. 
    • Visitors should maintain social distance and be diligent about hand hygiene.
    • We encourage you to connect with your loved ones by phone calls or video chat. For more information please see How to Virtually Visit Your Friends and Family.
  • Outpatient Surgeries and Procedures
    No visitors in hospital outpatient services unless the patient is undergoing an outpatient procedure or requires support with impairment or mobility needs.
  • Inpatient Hospital Stays
    One visitor daily is allowed for inpatient stays. 
  • Women’s Services
    • One visitor only for labor and delivery and postpartum and one outside care team member (doula, for example) 
    • Visiting hours are not restricted
  • Neonatal ICU (NICU)
    Two parents or guardians for Neonatal ICU (NICU)
  • Emergency Department
    No visitors in treatment areas of the Emergency Department unless needed to support with impairment or mobility needs.
  • Behavioral Health
    • No visitors.
    • One visitor, but only if needed to support outpatient minors with impairment or mobility needs.

    Thank you for helping to keep our community safe.

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Appointments and Access

If you have an upcoming appointment:

  • Contact your doctor’s office. You may be able to get care through a virtual visit, in the comfort of your home.
  • Virtual visits are available for some services and doctor offices.
  • If you are a Texas Health patient, call your doctor’s office to see if virtual appointments are available, and schedule an appointment.
  • If you have COVID-19 symptoms, call your doctor before you visit a Texas Health facility.
  • When visiting a Texas Health facility, a greeter will ask about your general health, take your temperature, and give you a face mask.

Thank you for choosing Texas Health. We look forward to serving you and your family.

Your Pregnancy and Delivery during COVID-19 Precautions
What to expect when you arrive at the hospital for a maternity stay.
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